Copyright 2018 - The Ark Trust Ltd

Feeling unwell? There are a range of services available to you in East Berkshire

Do you know which NHS service to use when you are unwell?

East Berkshire Feeling unwell where to go FINAL 1

Click here for a larger PDF of the above image.

NHS East Berkshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has published information to help residents understand the various NHS services available – day and night.

The information can be used to work out the best place to get advice or treatment when you are unwell. By following the expert advice of NHS staff, you can help your local NHS help you stay well; prevent an illness getting worse; and take the best course of action to feel well again.

Winter is always a busy time for the health service. If people go to the right service, it helps the NHS to work at its best and be there for those who really need it. That is why we are asking you to “help us, help you”.

Many minor illnesses and injuries can be dealt with away from hospitals, with shorter waiting times. For example, your local pharmacist can offer you free, qualified health advice, and no appointment is necessary. From coughs and colds to aches and pains, they can give you expert help on everyday illnesses and answer questions about prescribed and over-the-counter medicines.

If you need to speak to a clinician, need reassurance or don’t know where to go, call NHS 111. You will be directed to the most appropriate service or, be given an appointment to see a clinician if needed. The call is free of charge and the service is available 24 hours a day. This means no lengthy waits in hospital waiting rooms with other potentially unwell people.

If you do need to be seen in general practice outside of normal working hours, additional appointments with GPs and other healthcare professionals during evenings and weekends are available across East Berkshire. All you have to do is call your GP surgery to book an appointment. Please note that these appointments need to be pre-booked in advance as the service cannot accept walk-in patients. They are also in addition to some local GP practices offering in-house extended hours appointments for their patients. More details can be found here.

Everyone has a role to play in keeping themselves healthy, and the NHS can provide the information and advice you need to stay well. Visit nhs.uk/staywell

Carers Rights Day

Today is Carers’ Rights Day, when thousands of organisations across the country help carers to find out about and understand their rights and what support they can access. The event is led by Carers UK and supported by carers’ charities and organisations, big and small.

Carers make an enormous contribution to our health and care system and to our society, and the selfless way that millions of carers provide care and support of all kinds to their friends and relatives deserves special appreciation. Since the implementation of the Care Act in 2015, carers have more rights than ever before. The Act gave carers parity with the people they care for through new entitlements to an assessment of their needs, support to meet their eligible needs, and information and advice. We know there is much to do to embed good practice and raise awareness of carers’ rights, and make sure carers know where to go for help and feel able to ask for it. That is what Carers’ Rights Day is all about.

 

Looking after someone? Know your rights
Most of us will provide care at some point in our lives to ill or disabled loved ones. Whether caring affects your family gradually or suddenly, it is common to feel unprepared. Rules on benefits and the social care system can feel like a confusing maze. Without the right advice and information, it is easy to miss out on the financial and practical support you are entitled to. That’s why organisations up and down the country take part in Carers Rights Day, to reach out to the UK’s 6.5 million carers with information, advice and support. Here is a taster, with the top three steps everyone who is looking after a disabled, ill or older loved one should take to find out about their entitlements.

 

1. Get a benefits check
Carer’s Allowance is the main carers’ benefit – offering a small income now and National Insurance contributions towards your State Pension if you have given up work to care. But not everyone is eligible for the benefit, so make sure you get a full benefits check to see what other financial support you may be entitled to. Other support might include council tax discounts (but not in Northern Ireland, tax credits or help with fuel costs. For information on the financial support available, visit www.signal4carers.org.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you live in Bracknell Forest or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you live in the Borough of Windsor, Ascot and Maidenhead or visit the Turn2us website (turn2us.org.uk) or ring your local Citizens Advice Bureau.

 

2. Find out about practical support
You may need practical support to help you care, like short breaks, equipment to help make caring easier or information about local groups that can help. All carers are entitled to a carer’s assessment from their local council which could lead to them, or the person they are caring for, getting social care services to help with caring. The assessment will look at how caring affects your life, including your physical, mental and emotional needs, and whether you are able or willing to carry on caring. Contact your local council/trust social services department for a carer’s assessment or visit Signal4carers.org.uk for more information.

 

3.Carers and Employment rights
Working parents of children with disabilities (under the age of 18) have the right to request flexible working arrangements. You also have a statutory right to ask your employer for flexible working if you care for an adult who is a relative or lives at the same address as you.

 

4. Connect with other carers
Caring can be isolating. When we’re looking after someone, it’s not always easy to find people who really know what caring is like and are able to give us help and understanding. There are carer support groups across the UK that can help you meet other carers, as well as access local advice and support. Signal4Carers website has a directory of local services at Signal4carers.org.uk

 

 

 

NHS Healthy Ageing Guide and Healthy Caring guides

It can be harder for older people to stay fit and well throughout the colder months. It’s important that older people and their families and carers are supported to stay well throughout winter. The NHS Healthy Ageing Guide and Healthy Caring guides provide practical advice to support healthy ageing and caring. The Healthy Ageing Guide helps people to stay physically and mentally well by providing hints and tips on how to keep fit and independent, and the Healthy Caring Guide provides information and advice to carers about staying healthy themselves and identifies support available to help carers maintain their health and wellbeing.

Healthy Ageing Guide

Healthy Caring Guide

If you would like a printed copy of either of these please let us know.

Grants for Respite

Berkshire Community Foundation said "The Ark Trust received a £5,000 grant for SIGNAL4Carers to allow unpaid carers respite from their duties. SIGNAL provides free Support, Information, Guidance, Networking, Advice and Learning to all unpaid carers who care for someone in Bracknell Forest, Windsor, Ascot or Maidenhead.

A carer is someone who provides unpaid help and support to family or friends. You could be caring for a partner, child, relative, friend or a neighbour who is ill, frail, disabled or who has mental health or substance misuse problems; anyone can become a carer at any age. The carers could apply for grants of up to £300 to be spent how they felt best to achieve a break and have time for themselves. So far 14 people have received grants. Some have taken a short break whilst others have booked a regular activity."

Our thanks to Berkshire Community Foundation for enabling us to be able to distribute this money to unpaid carers. The quotes in the article linked below highlight the value having a break from caring can bring to people, we look forward to working with them again in the future.

Read more.

Support | Information | Guidance | Networking | Advice | Learning

carers information booklet    noticeboard    newsletters    Support Groups    usefulContacts

BFPartners